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Biography of Lucia Bosé

After working in a cake shop in Milan, the fortunes of the young Lucia Bosé (pseudonym of Lucia Borloni) changed dramatically in 1947 when she won the Miss Italia beauty contest. She acted in a short film by Dino Risi on the "Five days of Milan" ("1848", produced in 1948-1949 with the artistic support of Alberto Lattuada and Giorgio Strehler), then made her feature debut in "No Peace Under the Olive Tree (Non c’è pace tra gli ulivi)" (1950) by Giuseppe De Santis, the last film in the great neorealist master's "peasant" trilogy, in the role of a shepherdess from the Ciociaria area of Italy, alongside such well-known actors as Raf Vallone and Folco Lulli. In the same year, she delivered an outstanding performance as Paola Molon, the main character in "Story of a Love Affair (Cronaca di un amore)". This splendid first work by Michelanglo Antonioni combines an atmosphere of intrigue with an analysis of love in Milan's upper bourgeoisie.
Bosé was soon to work again with De Santis and Antonioni. In 1951, she played the role of Simona in De Santis' "Roma ore 11", a film that addresses the issue of female unemployment and offers some highly effective portraits of women (the actresses include Carla Del Poggio, Lea Padovani and Delia Scala). Then in 1953 Antonioni asked her to play Clara Manni, a former shop assistant turned actress who after initial success suffers failures in both her career and love life in "The Lady Without Camelias (La Signora senza camelie)". This bitter film examines the unauthentic nature of the film camera and reflects on the aridness that governs real-life relationships between human beings. During the same period Bosé played leading actress in numerous films, demonstrating her ability to adapt to a wide range of expressive requirements. She tackled the late-neorealist sentimental comedy in two of the most acclaimed films by Luciano Emmer: the entertaining "Paris is Always Paris (Parigi è sempre Parigi)" (1951) with Aldo Fabrizi and "Three Girls from Rome (Le ragazze di Piazza di Spagna)" (1952). In the latter she is perfectly cast in the role of a young seamstress turned model who does not forget her lowly origins and her love for her fiancé, a simple but pleasant young man. Bosé also acted in a series of films of a comical/farcical nature alongside Walter Chiari, including "E’ l’amor che mi rovina…" (1951) in the part of a young ski instructor in Sestrière, elegantly directed by Mario Soldati to a script and screenplay by Monicelli, Steno and Zapponi.
1955 was a landmark year for Lucia Bosé. She appeared in three important films, the culmination of a short but intense career marked by enormous professional success. In "Abandoned (Gli sbandati)" by Francesco Maselli, she plays with great sensitivity the pretty evacuee Lucia, with whom the young count Andrea (Jean-Pierre Mocky) falls in love. In Juan Antonio Bardem's The "Death of a Cyclist (La muerte de un ciclista)", she delivers a powerful performance in what remains one of the most memorable films produced under Franco's dictatorship. In "Cela s’appelle l’aurore (Gli amanti senza domani)", directed by Luis Buñuel during his temporary return to France after moving to Mexico, she plays Clara, an Italian widow living in Corsica who has a chaste love affair with the doctor Valerio (George Marchal) in a tale with a happy ending that constitutes a unique work in the great Aragonese director's filmography. In 1956 Lucia Bosé married the famous Spanish bullfighter Luis Domingín and gave up acting for a period until eventually separating from her husband. In the meantime she gave birth to Miguel, future actor and international singing star.
Between 1968 and 1976, Lucia Bosé returned to her acting career and was much sought after in Italy and abroad both by such renowned directors as Fellini, the Taviani brothers and Bolognini,  and by younger directors like Liliana Cavani, Nelo Risi and Giulio Questi. She also delivered intense performances in some highly original feminine stories directed by writer and film-director Marguerite Duras and her actress colleague Jeanne Moreau.
The first film she appeared in on her return to the cinema was "Nocturno 29" (1968) by Catalan director Pedro Portabella, leading exponent of the school of Barcelona, in which she played alongside Gabriele Ferzetti. She performed in a number of other films in Spain, including "A Winter in Mallorca (Jurtzenka, un invierno en Mallorca)", (1970) by Jaime Camino and "The Legend of Blood Castle (Cerimonia sangrienta)", (1972), an erotic horror film directed by Jorge Grau.
In "Fellini-Satyricon" (1969) by Federico Fellini, she appears in a single, memorable sequence, while in "Under the Sign of Scorpio (Sotto il segno dello Scorpione)", the visionary and complex apologue directed in the same year by the brothers Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, she plays alongside Gian Maria Volonté and Giulio Brogi. She enjoyed a longer lasting collaboration with the Pistoian director Mauro Bolognini, the first fruit of which was Metello (1970) with Ottavia Piccolo and Massimo Ranieri. This was followed by "Down the Ancient Staircase (Per le antiche scale)" (1975) with Marcello Mastroianni and Françoise Fabian and the television drama "The Charterhouse of Parma (La Certosa di Parma)" (1982) in the role of the Marchesa Del Dongo. These three films are characterised by Bolognini's elegant compositional style and are united by a common literary thread, being based on novels by Vasco Pratolini, Mario Tobino and Stendhal respectively. During the same period, again in Italy, Lucia Bosé appeared in a number of interesting films in which she gave some outstanding performances: in 1971 as a mentally ill woman in "L’ospite "by Liliana Cavani alongside Glauco Mauri; in 1972 in the bizarre "Arcana" by Giulio Questi, in the part of a widow who practises the profession of magic; and in 1972 in "La colonna infame" by Nelo Risi, taken from a work by Alessandro Manzoni. She once again proved her artistic maturity and her capacity for psychological introspection in "Nathalie Granger" (1972) directed by Marguerite Duras, where she plays Isabella, the mother of the girl after which the film is named.
Following her performance in "Violanta" by Donald Schmid, 1976 brought a second break in Lucia Bosé's career and she would not return to the cinema until the late 1980s, when she played two maternal figures. The first was in "Chronicle of a Death Foretold (Cronaca di una morte annunciata)" (1987) by Francesco Rosi (taken from the novel by Gabriel García Márquez), the second in "Volevo i pantaloni" (1990) by Maurizio Ponzi, an adaptation of the eponymous bestseller by Lara Cardella. Again in 1990, she appeared in "The Miser (L’avaro)", a cinematographic version of Molière's masterpiece directed by Tonino Cervi with Alberto Sordi and Laura Antonelli. In 1994 she resumed her work for the television with the mini-series "Surviving at the Top (Alta società)".

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Biography of Lucia Bosé

After working in a cake shop in Milan, the fortunes of the young Lucia Bosé (pseudonym of Lucia Borloni) changed dramatically in 1947 when she won the Miss Italia beauty contest. She acted in a short film by Dino Risi on the "Five days of Milan" ("1848", produced in 1948-1949 with the artistic support of Alberto Lattuada and Giorgio Strehler), then made her feature debut in "No Peace Under the Olive Tree (Non c’è pace tra gli ulivi)" (1950) by Giuseppe De Santis, the last film in the great neorealist master's "peasant" trilogy, in the role of a shepherdess from the Ciociaria area of Italy, alongside such well-known actors as Raf Vallone and Folco Lulli. In the same year, she delivered an outstanding performance as Paola Molon, the main character in "Story of a Love Affair (Cronaca di un amore)". This splendid first work by Michelanglo Antonioni combines an atmosphere of intrigue with an analysis of love in Milan's upper bourgeoisie.
Bosé was soon to work again with De Santis and Antonioni. In 1951, she played the role of Simona in De Santis' "Roma ore 11", a film that addresses the issue of female unemployment and offers some highly effective portraits of women (the actresses include Carla Del Poggio, Lea Padovani and Delia Scala). Then in 1953 Antonioni asked her to play Clara Manni, a former shop assistant turned actress who after initial success suffers failures in both her career and love life in "The Lady Without Camelias (La Signora senza camelie)". This bitter film examines the unauthentic nature of the film camera and reflects on the aridness that governs real-life relationships between human beings. During the same period Bosé played leading actress in numerous films, demonstrating her ability to adapt to a wide range of expressive requirements. She tackled the late-neorealist sentimental comedy in two of the most acclaimed films by Luciano Emmer: the entertaining "Paris is Always Paris (Parigi è sempre Parigi)" (1951) with Aldo Fabrizi and "Three Girls from Rome (Le ragazze di Piazza di Spagna)" (1952). In the latter she is perfectly cast in the role of a young seamstress turned model who does not forget her lowly origins and her love for her fiancé, a simple but pleasant young man. Bosé also acted in a series of films of a comical/farcical nature alongside Walter Chiari, including "E’ l’amor che mi rovina…" (1951) in the part of a young ski instructor in Sestrière, elegantly directed by Mario Soldati to a script and screenplay by Monicelli, Steno and Zapponi.
1955 was a landmark year for Lucia Bosé. She appeared in three important films, the culmination of a short but intense career marked by enormous professional success. In "Abandoned (Gli sbandati)" by Francesco Maselli, she plays with great sensitivity the pretty evacuee Lucia, with whom the young count Andrea (Jean-Pierre Mocky) falls in love. In Juan Antonio Bardem's The "Death of a Cyclist (La muerte de un ciclista)", she delivers a powerful performance in what remains one of the most memorable films produced under Franco's dictatorship. In "Cela s’appelle l’aurore (Gli amanti senza domani)", directed by Luis Buñuel during his temporary return to France after moving to Mexico, she plays Clara, an Italian widow living in Corsica who has a chaste love affair with the doctor Valerio (George Marchal) in a tale with a happy ending that constitutes a unique work in the great Aragonese director's filmography. In 1956 Lucia Bosé married the famous Spanish bullfighter Luis Domingín and gave up acting for a period until eventually separating from her husband. In the meantime she gave birth to Miguel, future actor and international singing star.
Between 1968 and 1976, Lucia Bosé returned to her acting career and was much sought after in Italy and abroad both by such renowned directors as Fellini, the Taviani brothers and Bolognini,  and by younger directors like Liliana Cavani, Nelo Risi and Giulio Questi. She also delivered intense performances in some highly original feminine stories directed by writer and film-director Marguerite Duras and her actress colleague Jeanne Moreau.
The first film she appeared in on her return to the cinema was "Nocturno 29" (1968) by Catalan director Pedro Portabella, leading exponent of the school of Barcelona, in which she played alongside Gabriele Ferzetti. She performed in a number of other films in Spain, including "A Winter in Mallorca (Jurtzenka, un invierno en Mallorca)", (1970) by Jaime Camino and "The Legend of Blood Castle (Cerimonia sangrienta)", (1972), an erotic horror film directed by Jorge Grau.
In "Fellini-Satyricon" (1969) by Federico Fellini, she appears in a single, memorable sequence, while in "Under the Sign of Scorpio (Sotto il segno dello Scorpione)", the visionary and complex apologue directed in the same year by the brothers Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, she plays alongside Gian Maria Volonté and Giulio Brogi. She enjoyed a longer lasting collaboration with the Pistoian director Mauro Bolognini, the first fruit of which was Metello (1970) with Ottavia Piccolo and Massimo Ranieri. This was followed by "Down the Ancient Staircase (Per le antiche scale)" (1975) with Marcello Mastroianni and Françoise Fabian and the television drama "The Charterhouse of Parma (La Certosa di Parma)" (1982) in the role of the Marchesa Del Dongo. These three films are characterised by Bolognini's elegant compositional style and are united by a common literary thread, being based on novels by Vasco Pratolini, Mario Tobino and Stendhal respectively. During the same period, again in Italy, Lucia Bosé appeared in a number of interesting films in which she gave some outstanding performances: in 1971 as a mentally ill woman in "L’ospite "by Liliana Cavani alongside Glauco Mauri; in 1972 in the bizarre "Arcana" by Giulio Questi, in the part of a widow who practises the profession of magic; and in 1972 in "La colonna infame" by Nelo Risi, taken from a work by Alessandro Manzoni. She once again proved her artistic maturity and her capacity for psychological introspection in "Nathalie Granger" (1972) directed by Marguerite Duras, where she plays Isabella, the mother of the girl after which the film is named.
Following her performance in "Violanta" by Donald Schmid, 1976 brought a second break in Lucia Bosé's career and she would not return to the cinema until the late 1980s, when she played two maternal figures. The first was in "Chronicle of a Death Foretold (Cronaca di una morte annunciata)" (1987) by Francesco Rosi (taken from the novel by Gabriel García Márquez), the second in "Volevo i pantaloni" (1990) by Maurizio Ponzi, an adaptation of the eponymous bestseller by Lara Cardella. Again in 1990, she appeared in "The Miser (L’avaro)", a cinematographic version of Molière's masterpiece directed by Tonino Cervi with Alberto Sordi and Laura Antonelli. In 1994 she resumed her work for the television with the mini-series "Surviving at the Top (Alta società)".

dx1.jpg (10849 byte)
dx2.jpg (14877 byte)
sbandx1.jpg (19517 byte)
dx1.jpg (10849 byte)
dx2.jpg (14877 byte)
sbandx1.jpg (19517 byte)
dx1.jpg (10849 byte)
logorai.gif (2283 byte)
trasp.gif (837 byte)

Italica is a Rai International production. The material displayed on this site is protected by copyright and is available for informative purposes only