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Cesare Pavese

The youngest of five children in a lower middle class family of rural origin, Cesare Pavese was born on 9th September 1908 in S. Stefano Belbo (province of Cuneo). His father died when he was six. He went to school in Turin, studying at high school under Augusto Monti, a friend of Piero Gobetti and Antonio Gramsci and a prominent figure in the anti-fascist Turin. He graduated in letters in 1932 with a thesis on Walt Whitman. During the same period he began working as a translator for the publisher Frassinelli, translating Moby Dick by Melville and Dark Laughter by Sherwood Anderson. In 1934 he was appointed editor of the magazine Cultura. In May 1935, he was arrested for political reasons and interned at Brancaleone Calabro. He returned to Turin in 1936 and made his debut the same year with the collection of verses entitled Lavorare stanca (Hard Labour). He took refuge with his sister in Serralunga after 8 September, and at the end of the war joined the Italian Communist Part (PCI). In 1945 he published I dialoghi col compagno in L'Unità, the party's newspaper. His most memorable works include the novels Paesi tuoi (1941), La spiaggia (1942), Il compagno (1947), La casa in collina (House on the Hill) (1948), La bella estate (1949) and La luna e i falò (The Moon and the Bonfires) (1950). He also wrote the unusual Dialoghi con Leucò (Dialogues with Leucò) (1947), the poems of Verrà la morte ed avrà i tuoi occhi (1951) and the diary Il mestiere di vivere (The Business of Living) (1952). Suffering from one of his recurrent fits of depression, Cesare Pavese committed suicide on 27 August 1950 in a hotel in Turin by taking twelve sachets of sleeping drugs.

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Italica is a Rai International production. The material displayed on this site is protected by copyright and is available for informative purposes only

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Cesare Pavese

The youngest of five children in a lower middle class family of rural origin, Cesare Pavese was born on 9th September 1908 in S. Stefano Belbo (province of Cuneo). His father died when he was six. He went to school in Turin, studying at high school under Augusto Monti, a friend of Piero Gobetti and Antonio Gramsci and a prominent figure in the anti-fascist Turin. He graduated in letters in 1932 with a thesis on Walt Whitman. During the same period he began working as a translator for the publisher Frassinelli, translating Moby Dick by Melville and Dark Laughter by Sherwood Anderson. In 1934 he was appointed editor of the magazine Cultura. In May 1935, he was arrested for political reasons and interned at Brancaleone Calabro. He returned to Turin in 1936 and made his debut the same year with the collection of verses entitled Lavorare stanca (Hard Labour). He took refuge with his sister in Serralunga after 8 September, and at the end of the war joined the Italian Communist Part (PCI). In 1945 he published I dialoghi col compagno in L'Unità, the party's newspaper. His most memorable works include the novels Paesi tuoi (1941), La spiaggia (1942), Il compagno (1947), La casa in collina (House on the Hill) (1948), La bella estate (1949) and La luna e i falò (The Moon and the Bonfires) (1950). He also wrote the unusual Dialoghi con Leucò (Dialogues with Leucò) (1947), the poems of Verrà la morte ed avrà i tuoi occhi (1951) and the diary Il mestiere di vivere (The Business of Living) (1952). Suffering from one of his recurrent fits of depression, Cesare Pavese committed suicide on 27 August 1950 in a hotel in Turin by taking twelve sachets of sleeping drugs.

1.jpg (11018 bytes)
1.jpg (11018 bytes)
1.jpg (11018 bytes)
logorai.gif (2283 byte)
trasp.gif (837 byte)

Italica is a Rai International production. The material displayed on this site is protected by copyright and is available for informative purposes only