Homepage di Italica: Italiano   Rai International

Feed RSS

Newsletter

Feedback

Information

Site map

Biography of Patty Pravo

Patty Pravo (stage name of Nicoletta Strambelli) was born in Venice in 1948. At the age of five, she began attending piano and dance classes at the Teatro la Fenice in Venice. At ten, she enrolled at the Benedetto Marcello Conservatory. She later signed up for the conducting course, but unexpectedly interrupted her studies and left for London, where she stayed for several months. On returning to Italy, she moved to Rome, where she became a role model of hippy fashion. She frequented the well-known Rome club the Piper and drew the attention of several leading film directors (including Fellini and Antonioni) and Alberico Crocetta, owner of the Piper club, who asked her to sing. She began performing on stage, singing rhythm'n'blues. She became a local idol who personified the desire for change and for life on the edge that was felt by young people of the period. In 1966 under the pseudonym of Patty Pravo she recorded her first single for ARC (RCA Italiana), Ragazzo triste, a cover of a song by Sonny Bono. With this track she took part in Scala Reale, a TV programme linked to the New Year's lottery. Her contemporaries immediately saw her as a symbol of rebellion and the record entered the charts at number eight. But the girl from the Piper club was developing rapidly. It took just a couple of hits (Qui e là, which she sang at the Cantagiro festival in 1967, and Se perdo te) for her to undergo a radical transformation. She was now a high-class singer and the epitome of a stylish, sophisticated woman. Discographic success was not long in coming. In the spring of 1968 she reached number 1 in the charts with La bambola. She released her long-awaited first album, which included such international hits as Yesterday, Old Man River and River Deep Mountain High. She was riding the crest of the wave and at the 1968 Canzonissima festival reached fifth place with Conte's Tripoli 1969. In 1969 RAI devoted a special feature to her. The same year she won the Festivalbar, where she sang Il paradiso by Mogol and Battisti, while in the autumn she was back at Canzonissima with Rain by José Feliciano, translated into Nel giardino dell'amore. In 1970, she took part in the Sanremo Festival for the first time. She sang La spada nel cuore together with Little Tony and received the critics' prize. Yet another enormous success, this song again marked the beginning of a radical transformation. She was becoming much more sophisticated artistically (she recorded Per te by Battisti, Non andare via, the translation of Ne me quitte pas by Brel, and Tutt'al più). However, while the Patty Pravo sensation was an economic success, the artistic aspect was fraught with difficulties. In 1971 she left RCA for Phonogram and recorded the single Love Story and the album Di vero in fondo (with the title track by Paoli, E tornò la primavera by Guccini, Emozioni by Battisti, Samba preludio by Vinicius De Moraes and Le foglie morte). There followed another two albums which did not achieve the expected success in spite of containing such jewels as Col tempo by Leo Ferré, A modo mio (translation of My Way) and Poema degli occhi by De Moraes. Disappointed, she returned to RCA and recorded the successful album Pazza idea (which contains Poesia by Riccardo Cocciante and I giardini di Kensington, a cover of Lou Reed's Walk On The Wild Side). She was now back at the top of the charts. Her next album, Mai una signora, with arrangements by Bacalov, was equally successful. Over the next two years, she recorded Incontro and Tanto, a widely-released album recorded in London and arranged by Vangelis. Yet again she left RCA. She signed a contract with Ricordi and began to experiment with funky and new wave music. The result was Patty Pravo, an album that was too experimental to be widely successful. There followed two years without recording, a silence broken only by reports in the tabloid newspapers and nude features in Playboy. In 1978, she returned to RCA and presented Ivano Fossati's Pensiero stupendo at the St. Vincent festival. Back in the hit parade, she released the album Miss Italia. During the same period she took part in the variety show Stryx hosted by Enzo Trapani, at the time one of the most original TV programmes on the air. Another difficult period now began. In Germany she recorded Munich Album, but was deeply disappointed with its lukewarm reception. She moved to the United States and returned three years later to release Cerchi, an album written in collaboration with Paul Martinez. Once again, however, it was a sales flop. This was a difficult and tormented period for her. In 1984 she signed a contract with CGD and returned to the Sanremo festival with the song Per una bambola. This time the public appeared to be more receptive and she was praised by the critics. Again with CGD she recorded Occulte persuasioni, but without exceptional results. Yet again she changed record company. This time she signed a contract with Virgin and returned to the Sanremo festival with Pigramente signora. However, it was once again a disappointment and another failed record contract. In 1990 she turned down the opportunity to sing Donna con te at the Sanremo Festival (which in the event was sung by Anna Oxa), and the discographic difficulties, bitterness and misunderstandings worsened. It was not until 1997, after various attempts to make a comeback, that she finally achieved enormous success at the Sanremo Festival with her splendid rendition of Vasco Rossi's song Dimmi che non vuoi morire and the album Notte, guai e libertà, which won her back an audience that in reality had never forgotten her.

dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)
logorai.gif (2283 byte)
trasp.gif (837 byte)

Italica is a Rai International production. The material displayed on this site is protected by copyright and is available for informative purposes only

Biography of Patty Pravo

Patty Pravo (stage name of Nicoletta Strambelli) was born in Venice in 1948. At the age of five, she began attending piano and dance classes at the Teatro la Fenice in Venice. At ten, she enrolled at the Benedetto Marcello Conservatory. She later signed up for the conducting course, but unexpectedly interrupted her studies and left for London, where she stayed for several months. On returning to Italy, she moved to Rome, where she became a role model of hippy fashion. She frequented the well-known Rome club the Piper and drew the attention of several leading film directors (including Fellini and Antonioni) and Alberico Crocetta, owner of the Piper club, who asked her to sing. She began performing on stage, singing rhythm'n'blues. She became a local idol who personified the desire for change and for life on the edge that was felt by young people of the period. In 1966 under the pseudonym of Patty Pravo she recorded her first single for ARC (RCA Italiana), Ragazzo triste, a cover of a song by Sonny Bono. With this track she took part in Scala Reale, a TV programme linked to the New Year's lottery. Her contemporaries immediately saw her as a symbol of rebellion and the record entered the charts at number eight. But the girl from the Piper club was developing rapidly. It took just a couple of hits (Qui e là, which she sang at the Cantagiro festival in 1967, and Se perdo te) for her to undergo a radical transformation. She was now a high-class singer and the epitome of a stylish, sophisticated woman. Discographic success was not long in coming. In the spring of 1968 she reached number 1 in the charts with La bambola. She released her long-awaited first album, which included such international hits as Yesterday, Old Man River and River Deep Mountain High. She was riding the crest of the wave and at the 1968 Canzonissima festival reached fifth place with Conte's Tripoli 1969. In 1969 RAI devoted a special feature to her. The same year she won the Festivalbar, where she sang Il paradiso by Mogol and Battisti, while in the autumn she was back at Canzonissima with Rain by José Feliciano, translated into Nel giardino dell'amore. In 1970, she took part in the Sanremo Festival for the first time. She sang La spada nel cuore together with Little Tony and received the critics' prize. Yet another enormous success, this song again marked the beginning of a radical transformation. She was becoming much more sophisticated artistically (she recorded Per te by Battisti, Non andare via, the translation of Ne me quitte pas by Brel, and Tutt'al più). However, while the Patty Pravo sensation was an economic success, the artistic aspect was fraught with difficulties. In 1971 she left RCA for Phonogram and recorded the single Love Story and the album Di vero in fondo (with the title track by Paoli, E tornò la primavera by Guccini, Emozioni by Battisti, Samba preludio by Vinicius De Moraes and Le foglie morte). There followed another two albums which did not achieve the expected success in spite of containing such jewels as Col tempo by Leo Ferré, A modo mio (translation of My Way) and Poema degli occhi by De Moraes. Disappointed, she returned to RCA and recorded the successful album Pazza idea (which contains Poesia by Riccardo Cocciante and I giardini di Kensington, a cover of Lou Reed's Walk On The Wild Side). She was now back at the top of the charts. Her next album, Mai una signora, with arrangements by Bacalov, was equally successful. Over the next two years, she recorded Incontro and Tanto, a widely-released album recorded in London and arranged by Vangelis. Yet again she left RCA. She signed a contract with Ricordi and began to experiment with funky and new wave music. The result was Patty Pravo, an album that was too experimental to be widely successful. There followed two years without recording, a silence broken only by reports in the tabloid newspapers and nude features in Playboy. In 1978, she returned to RCA and presented Ivano Fossati's Pensiero stupendo at the St. Vincent festival. Back in the hit parade, she released the album Miss Italia. During the same period she took part in the variety show Stryx hosted by Enzo Trapani, at the time one of the most original TV programmes on the air. Another difficult period now began. In Germany she recorded Munich Album, but was deeply disappointed with its lukewarm reception. She moved to the United States and returned three years later to release Cerchi, an album written in collaboration with Paul Martinez. Once again, however, it was a sales flop. This was a difficult and tormented period for her. In 1984 she signed a contract with CGD and returned to the Sanremo festival with the song Per una bambola. This time the public appeared to be more receptive and she was praised by the critics. Again with CGD she recorded Occulte persuasioni, but without exceptional results. Yet again she changed record company. This time she signed a contract with Virgin and returned to the Sanremo festival with Pigramente signora. However, it was once again a disappointment and another failed record contract. In 1990 she turned down the opportunity to sing Donna con te at the Sanremo Festival (which in the event was sung by Anna Oxa), and the discographic difficulties, bitterness and misunderstandings worsened. It was not until 1997, after various attempts to make a comeback, that she finally achieved enormous success at the Sanremo Festival with her splendid rendition of Vasco Rossi's song Dimmi che non vuoi morire and the album Notte, guai e libertà, which won her back an audience that in reality had never forgotten her.

dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)dx.jpg (7357 byte)
logorai.gif (2283 byte)
trasp.gif (837 byte)

Italica is a Rai International production. The material displayed on this site is protected by copyright and is available for informative purposes only